The life and routine of iranian director jafar panahi in the documentary this is not a film

Taxi was well-received by critics and buyers Celluloid Dreams has international rights during the festival. In the film, Panahi set a camera on the dashboard of a yellow cab as it drives through Tehran. He plays the cabbie who interviews the diverse characters that make up his fares.

The life and routine of iranian director jafar panahi in the documentary this is not a film

Share via Email Caught Offside The idea of failure or career reversal is gossiped about or giggled at with embarrassment or schadenfreude. His opening weekend numbers were soft! He may have to go into TV. But just in case we needed a reminder that film-making actually means something, and that something is at stake in being a film-maker, comes some astonishing news from Iran.

The director Jafar Panahi has been sentenced to six years in prison and banned from film-making for 20 years due to what appear to be still cloudily formulated offences: Panahi is a well-known supporter of the Green movement and the opposition to Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president.

He has already been arrested and jailed several times following the democratic protests of Now the Iranian state has spoken with chilling decision.

The social brutality, cultural nullity, political arrogance and geopolitical incompetence of this move is breathtaking. To silence an artist, and indeed to alienate possible constituencies of liberal sympathy for Iran in the west, is fantastically crass.

The Berlin film festival has already invited Panahi to join its jury in Februaryfor a start. Berlin, Cannes, Venice, London, Edinburgh, Sundance, Telluride and every film festival in the world should make Panahi their jury president, and keep doing so for every year this gross injustice is maintained.

Jeremy Hunt, our culture secretary, should make representations. The Index On Censorship should clearly support Panahi. His films are great. Offside is a gentle, deeply charming film about two women, football fanatics, doing their darnedest to defy the all-male rule at football stadia and sneak into the Iran v Bahrain qualifying international for the World Cup.

His drama Crimson Gold was a movie I, on a purely personal level, liked a little less, but which has become a firm favourite with many followers of Middle Eastern film and gained a passionate following among cinephiles.

Panahi took the model of a thriller, with resemblances to Tarantino and Kubrick, and drew from it a character study.

In The CirclePanahi had the nerve to show women not being submissive — or perhaps it is simply that he showed women; they were not invisible.

Four female characters have been marginalised by a male society: They are similar places. The meaning of that is obvious, but the power and human delineation of his film-making are not so obvious.

The life and routine of iranian director jafar panahi in the documentary this is not a film

Panahi is candid about the reality of prostitution and the sex industry in Iran. His movie blasts the hypocrisy, evasiveness and cruelty of the men in charge.

Panahi is an important, powerful voice. It is disgusting that it should be silenced by the malign clumsiness of the state. How about a protest retrospective at the BFI Southbank?For Iranian director Jafar Panahi, officially banned by his country from making films and traveling for at least the next decade, necessity and courage have been the mothers of his cinematic invention.

It's been months since Jafar Panahi, stuck in jail, has been awaiting a verdict by the appeals court. By depicting a day in his life, Panahi and Mojtaba Mirtahmasb try to portray the deprivations looming in contemporary Iranian cinema.

This Is Not A Film and Closed Curtain, the first two films of the director’s house-imprisonment period, are more triumphs of personal expression than of filmmaking; testing but not transcending his restrictions, Panahi mostly succeeds in communicating the injustice of his situation.

For the past few years, Iranian director Jafar Panahi has been sending a series of quietly confounding films to festivals that he’s not allowed to attend. “Three Faces,” which premiered this weekend at the Cannes Film Festival, is the latest of these little examples of his cinematic sleight-of-hand, and another Panahi gem that has more on its mind than it lets on.

This Is Not A Film is a documentary chronicling a day in the life of Panahi while under house arrest after falling out with the autocratic regime, may be his best remembered work. Iranian film director Jafar Panahi has delivered insightful movies such as Crimson Gold and Offside.

For the past few years, Iranian director Jafar Panahi has been sending a series of quietly confounding films to festivals that he’s not allowed to attend. “Three Faces,” which premiered this.

Jafar Panahi’s Taxi :: Movies :: Reviews :: Paste