An analysis of negative outlook on life in the catcher in the rye by jd salinger

Hire Writer Slinger uses effective characterization to explore how Holder finds growing up painful and difficult. Holder is frightened of maturing because of his interpretation of the adult word and so he detaches himself from all adults. He seems to be old, physically, but Inside he Is still Just a child, this reinforces the Idea that his body Is ailing him to grow up, but his mind is telling him to resist, and stay as innocent as possible for as long as possible.

An analysis of negative outlook on life in the catcher in the rye by jd salinger

Ossenburger, conversation with Ackley 4. Saturday night with Ackley and Mal Brossard; thoughts about Allie 6. Horwitz and the ducks, at Ernie's, talking with Lillian Simmons He's sarcastic, nasty, and completely unlikeable.

He also doesn't give a crap. He is every teenager caught between the crappy little games of high school "you're supposed to kill yourself if the football team loses or something" and the fear of adulthood "going to get an office job and make a lot of money like the rest of the phonies".

The greatness in Holden Caulfield is that what he has to say is better than a million Celestine Prophecies or anything said by Jonathan Livingston Seagull save for the squawks after you shoot him or Jesus save for the apocryphal "hey Peter I can see your house from here". Holden Caulfield says that life sucks, everyone is a phony, and you'll be inevitably disappointed by everyone that you hold in awe.

If you think that this sounds awful, ask yourself one question. When was the last time you found any joy in watching Barney or the Care Bears? It isn't just what he says but the way he says it. He goes through life making dead-on observations that completely shoot the kneecaps out from under the terminally self-righteous.

When a successful mortician tells the school to follow his example and pray when things go bad, it is Holden Caulfield who points out that the guy is praying for more people to die.

Home › American Literature › Analysis of J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. Analysis of J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye By Nasrullah Mambrol on June 17, • (0) the stories do not seem to be about applying Buddhist principles to modern life, nor do they present a clear and coherent statement of what these. Holden’s outlook on life reflects Holden’s current dilemma in that Holden is now unidentified of society and fights corrupt “phonies.”, the sum of such a traumatic history results in negative impact on Holden’s mental health as he becomes misplaced and roams about the streets. Holden carries an alienated, negative and isolated outlook on life, seeing himself as an outsider, and criticizing things he sees as superficial, often using the word "phony". This attitude is characteristic of some Jewish authors like J.D. Salinger, who feel like outsiders.

He's depressed by nuns and annoyed by shallow girlfriends, while in love with his platonic friend. Even more interesting is the fact that Caulfield's general pissed off attitude and his hormones are inextricably linked.

He practically wants to kill his roommate, Stradlater, because Stradlater might have screwed a girl he desires.

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He guiltily admits to making out with phonies, and in a major confession he confesses to being a virgin. He gets the crap beat out of him by a disgruntled pimp after deciding that he doesn't want a to have sex with a prostitute for the silliest of reasons.

The fact that his little brother has just died and that he's being kicked out of yet another school takes second place to the whole sex question.

In other words, Holden Caulfield is a guy; stereotype away. What is also interesting is how closely Caulfield captures the attitude and culture of adolescence.

There is the caste system in which Caulfield hates and wishes to be his roommate Stradlater. Meanwhile zit-encrusted Ackley, whom he maybe should feel sympathy for, is an annoying guy that Holden can't wait to get out of his room. He's sympathetic to the principle's daughter, saying that it's not her fault what kind of a bastard her old man is, and without missing a beat remarks on the fact that she pads her bra.

Cruelty and frustration are mixed, but the comedy level allows you to laugh at your own painful memories. Granted, like many of his fans, Holden Caulfield turns out to be nuts or at least residing in an insane asylum.

COLLECTIONS

Sorry, if you think that those stupid surprise endings are the best reason to read Salinger. Yet, in Caulfield's insanity, there is a transcendent theme. By being the pissed off, nasty, cynical insane bastard; Holden Caulfield suggests that it is ok to be a crap. Your criticisms of the world are not invalid and nothing you say or think is so bad that you need to repress it.

Ironically, this is not only something that is essential to survival especially if you are a teenager and desperately trying to maintain your lily-white self image but is also the key to ultimately becoming a decent caring human being.

Keep your prophets, preachers and shamans. I'll take Holden Caulfield over them any day. It's about nothing much - just what it means to human. There's a tendency for reviews of The Catcher In The Rye to speak of it as a teenagers' book, a story 'about' the problems of being a misunderstood school kid in a cold adult world.

But Salinger's novel didn't become a classic by catering for the teen market. Its universal appeal stems from its universal theme. At heart we are ALL misunderstood, and it's a cold old world out there.Home › American Literature › Analysis of J.

D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye. Analysis of J.

Academic Help: The Literary Significance of J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye

D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye By Nasrullah Mambrol on June 17, • (0) the stories do not seem to be about applying Buddhist principles to modern life, nor do they present a clear and coherent statement of what these. J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, by some is considered one of the greatest books of all time, is also very controversial.

An analysis of negative outlook on life in the catcher in the rye by jd salinger

It has been banned or challenged in many schools throughout the. The Catcher in the Rye, written by an American writer Jerome David Salinger, describes in detail maturing of the year old protagonist Holden Caufield, and his relationship with family members, representing the essential role in his life and generally shaping of his character.

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Who gave up literary fame and became a recluse? JD Salinger. What genre is the novel? Realistic fiction, coming-of-age. What is the year it was set?

s. What are the three states the novel is net in? Pennsylvania, New York, Maine Negative outlook on life. What is Holden great at doing and proud. JD Salinger () He was raised in nyc and lived a reclusive life (sort of an autobiography) When was the book published? The Catcher in the Rye Review.

OTHER SETS BY THIS CREATOR. 22 terms. Exam 2. terms. GRE Math Formulas, GRE Math . quotes from The Catcher in the Rye: ‘What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was Home My Books.

Catcher in the Rye author JD Salinger would not be caught in the public eye | Books | The Guardian