An analysis of global land grabbing

February 25, at 3:

An analysis of global land grabbing

GRAIN 14 June Against the grainLand Eight years after releasing its first report on land grabbing, which put the issue on the international agenda, GRAIN publishes a new dataset documenting nearly cases of land grabbing around the world.

It exposed how a new wave of land grabbing was sweeping the planet in the name of addressing the global food and financial crises. On the other hand, food corporations and private investors, hungry for profits in the midst of the deepening financial crisis, see investment in foreign farmland as an important new source of revenue.

Little did we know that by merely pulling the news clips and analysis together, the report would trigger a tsunami of global media attention, social activism and political struggle—not to mention corporate headaches.

Eight years later, we went back to look at the data—the myriad reports of land grabbing for food production that we have been following and assessing. Over the past several years, GRAIN staff and allies in different regions have been tracking media and other information sources on a daily basis and posting reports on land grab developments to the open-publishing platform farmlandgrab.

The Global Land Grab

We used this website as the basis for constructing this dataset, which holds land deals covering over 30 million hectares spanning 78 countries. Rather, it is in many ways deepening, expanding An analysis of global land grabbing new frontiers and intensifying conflict around the world.

We hope this updated dataset will be useful tool for movements, communities, researchers and activists fighting against land grabbing and defending community-based food systems. First of all, the emerging new trend we wrote about in has continued and become worse. While most countries are not currently experiencing the extreme price hikes in basic foodstuffs that triggered riots from Haiti to Egypt back inprices remain stubbornly high and access to food is a daily struggle for most people.

Harvest losses due to extreme weather have become so acute in places like the southern Philippines that farmers are in the streets begging for food and getting killed for it. Indeed, climate change and land grabs are inextricably linked.

An analysis of global land grabbing

Some of the most egregious land deals we witnessed over the past several years have since backfired or failed for different reasons. Inpublic outrage over the 1. Inthe assassination of Libyan leader Mouamar Gaddafi put an end to his regime's ,hectare rice project in Mali.

In light of the food crisis, to secure reliable future access to sufficient agricultural land, many nations and corporations have begun purchasing large tracts of land in the global South, a phenomenon deemed “land grabbing” by popular media. The term “land grabbing” or “global land grab” refers to large scale acquisitions of vast tracts of land within developing countries by foreign governments, transnationals and anonymous investors in controversial or extremely lop-sided deals. Update: The Law and Legal research in Zambia By Alfred S. Magagula Alfred S. Magagula is a graduate fellow from the University of Swaziland. He holds B.A. law and LLB degree from the same university. He has done research with various consultancy firms in Swaziland before.

Other large-scale deals have been scaled back. In Cameroon, for example, after much protest, the Herakles deal was slashed from 73, to 19, hectares. Some deals have morphed into less direct forms of land takeover. In Brazil and Argentina, for instance, Chinese companies facing concerns about foreigners grabbing land have tried to work out deals to secure the production from farms rather than purchasing the land themselves.

We say hard-core because these deals are large, long-term and determined to avoid the pitfalls that earlier deals ran into. Much of the Asian-led oil palm expansion in Africa, and the advance of pension funds and trade conglomerates to secure access to new farmlands, fall into this category.

As land deals rise and fall, policymakers and corporate boards are hard at work trying to facilitate their success. Instead of the wild land rush of before, we now have multiple "frameworks" and "guidelines" on how to conduct these deals while minimising social and environmental costs.

All of these new rules are voluntary, however, and do more to obfuscate the problem than to solve it. Many argue that the heightened political attention around land grabbing has helped bring land and agrarian reform back into public debates in parliaments and other legislative fora.

But the main objective of regulatory processes is still to formalise land markets and titles, which experience tells us will lead to further concentration of land in the hands of few. People are now more informed and taking action like never before. There are numerous coalitions and campaigns against land grabbing operating at local, national and regional levels.

In many places, these struggles are converging, bringing together farmers, migrant groups, fisherfolk, indigenous peoples, pastoralists and others. These movements are developing new strategies to challenge corporations and governments and building international solidarity. Meanwhile, journalists and other media workers have become important allies in getting the word out—often at great peril to their personal safety.

As resistance to land grabbing grows, the difficulties and dangers of engaging in this work are intensifying. Activists are detained and imprisoned; journalists are harassed with libel cases and even killed; and peasant and indigenous leaders are routinely murdered.

But this challenging, courageous work is crucial if we are to turn the tide of land grabbing and corporate-led agriculture and create a thriving global movement for food justice and food sovereignty. What exactly does the data tell us?

Our first land grab dataset in exposed about initiatives, launched by both governments and corporations, many of which were still in an exploratory phase at the time.

The deals cover over 30 million hectares of land in 78 countries. This means that the number of land deals is continuing to grow, but the growth has slowed since The stories and analysis in Grabbing Back helped contextualize our local struggle in the global flows and dynamics of capital.

Coming back to Utah, I’m writing on land that was grabbed from the indigenous Ute barely a century ago. Even as SADC calls for an end to restrictive policies Zimbabwe will have to achieve new levels of domestic political and economic liberalization.

Update: The Law and Legal research in Zambia - GlobaLex

THE GLOBAL LAND GRAB: An Analysis of Extant Governance Institutions Phoebe Stephens Introduction Headlines such as In Corrupt Global Food System Farmland is the New Gold and Land Grabs in Poor Countries Set to Increase reflect the urgent tone of a recent surge in media coverage on the ‘global land grab.’1 At first glance it appears that.

We attempt to address this gap by offering a preliminary analysis through an analytical approach that suggests some typologies as a step towards a fuller and better understanding of the politics of global land grabbing.

Citing Literature. Eight years after releasing its first report on land grabbing, which put the issue on the international agenda, GRAIN publishes a new dataset documenting nearly . In light of the food crisis, to secure reliable future access to sufficient agricultural land, many nations and corporations have begun purchasing large tracts of land in the global South, a phenomenon deemed “land grabbing” by popular media.

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